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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
and not pounding on the taliban hard -- hard enough. where i disagree with that is, the soviets killed 1.2 million of people out of 24 million people. how many people mathematically-- do we have to kill? when you go to work, there are other effects. you start destroying people's houses. if the taliban comes into our house and start shooting at us, we have the legal right to level the house. if you have to through -- to survive, do it. if you don't have to come back away. people said we were being solved. if i blow up that house, even if the taliban are in it, the people who own the house if they are lucky enough not to be in there and when we blow it up, they do not feel liberated after word. afghans use to tell me, there are three outcomes, either you win, the taliban winds, or we get stuck in this protracted war. they have been at war for 34 years now. they said, we would like you to win, but our second guest is that the taliban wins. but we cannot stand is that the war goes on forever. pretty interesting and rational behavior. impossible. i do not think it is ever impossible. but i think is ver
and terrorism where boys and girls rarely get to play together, and music was banned under the taliban rule, but with help from the state department and the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony here in the u.s. >> 13-year-old lala has been waiting two years for this moment. ♪ the chance to perform on the world stage while breaking snoer taliban tab your. girls and boys playing music together. >> which do you like better? the drums or the trumphet? which is more fun? >> the drum. >> the drums? >> she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they are nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sounds from their homeland. thn the tambore mixed with the western harmonies they are also learning. ♪ organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> should the future afghanistan show a
strikes. the images that surfaced showing marines urinating on the corps of taliban fighters. the accidental burning of the koran that started a wave of violence that included the killing of u.s. troops. and the massacre of 16 civilians in a shooting rampage allegedly at the hands of an american soldier. >> we have a casualty. >> reporter: general allen fought back tears when he said more than 560 coalition forces were killed on his watch, the vast majority american. >> we acknowledge that there is a chair at a table at home, a chair that is empty and will always be. and we can never forget them. and they are in our prayers always. >> reporter: as general allen says his final good-byes here in afghanistan, what no one knows is whether general dunford will one day be holding his own handover ceremony or whether he will be the united states last commander in afghanistan. there's still plenty to do, before the end of 2014 general dunford will have to wind down america's longest war, bring home most of the remaining u.s. forces and staggering amount of equipment while handing the
music. >> this is the first time she has left the country. >> the taliban are fighting every day. in america is peaceful. >> u.s. offices are going to see progress is made, and i hope we are able to show it is important for americans to stand side-by- side and support them in whatever ways we can. >> what is talk of their wish list? >> i want to see the american president. >> the music has given an escape. they have known nothing but war. >> showing this side -- a different side. you can carry on watching bbc.com on our 24-hour website. thanks for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key, strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world
, described by the 9-11 commission as a square feet all out secret effort to expose to taliban to osama bin laden." as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, the bin laden wrath was unleashed by the attack on our embassies. did you advice director tenet and berger against this operation. >> i had a conversation with george tenet at the time. but i must point out, senator, that every single cia manager. george tenet and other individuals, the chief of the counter terrorism center, organized against that operation as well. because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and it's chance of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals were going to be killed. so when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether or not i thought that operation should go forward. and i was also engaged in discussions with the saudi government at the time and encouraged certain actions to be taken, to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> so i'm taking it that your answer it my question is you did a
and the taliban. what on earth are we doing over there? why do we care about the hearts or minds or building the schools? i mean, outside of osama bin laden going to afghanistan and tricking the taliban into this spectacular attack on america, in general the muslims in afghanistan like the ones in indonesiaia have not exported terrorism. that's been the specialty of other countries. they really just want to be left alone so why don't we just leave them alone, as long as they're not plotting an attack on us, what is the point? >> michelle flournoy just laid out calmly four or five great ways to reduce the pentagon budget, including getting out of afghanistan, taking the civilian population in the d.o.d. down because we're leaving afghanistan. i thought it was pretty good, ann. somebody ought to listen to her. >> yes, i agree. i'm glad you brought up with her the base closings. this is why you seed something like a closure. the american people are of two find minds. they think government should be smaller, thinks government wants too. but the second you name a specific program that's going to
/11 commission as a, quote, an all-out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. now, as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, the bin laden wrath was unleashed with the attack on our embassies. did you advise senator director tenet and national security adviser berger against this operation and if so why? >> i had conversation with george tenet at the time. but i must point out, senator, that every single cia manager, george tenet, his deputy, the head of the director of operations at the time, chief of the counterterrorism center argued against that operation, as well. because it was not well grounded in intelligence and it chance of success were minimal. minimal. and it was likely that other individuals were going to be kilned. and so, when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my programal advice of whether or not i thought that that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussions with saudi arabia government at the time and encouraged certain actions to be taken to put pressure on the taliban and bin laden.
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overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there. of course, afghanistan fell apart and we had go back. anorak it's falling apart very, very quickly. we are facing an insurgency, we don't know what to do. like nagl, all the officers who were there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. they do know what to do so they did what they usually do. which was to bang down doors and arrest and kill people, which is anybody who would read nagl what is known is counterproductive because you wind up killing the wrong people. you inflame, you this off their brother and their cousins and they become insurgents, too. so the insurgents is going. meanwhile, petraeus upend mosul besides to put into effect the ideas of these books he's been reading. so he and his guys, they start setting up elections for the new district council. they set up the elections. they bring in fuel trucks from turkey. they read open the university. they get to mutation systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria along northern iraq. it is all this on his own. he's
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
did after we drove the soviets out, but as a message to the taliban and neighbors that were not walking away either. >> you were around for the iraq war and around for much of the war in afghanistan, so i feel like you have a pretty good feel on what enough forces would be. is 3,000 too little? do you have any sense of that? >> i guess the way i would put it, just in stinctively, i think 3,000 is too little and 30,000 is too many. finding the goldilocks number. i think 30,000, i think it's too high in cost for us and in terms for the afghans themselves. more a political question than a military question. >> and finally, coming up to the state of the union. you know how this works, everybody wants to hear a certain thng, depending on which department you're in. from the point of view of the military and the world at large and america's place in it, what do you look for when the president gives this speech on tuesday? >> well, it's -- it's hard to say sort of off the top of my head. i think that clearly i would like to hear something about let's figure out a way to avoid the s
was banned for years by the taliban. now with help from the state department, the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony. 13-year-old leila zhari has been waiting two years for this moment, the chance to perform on the world stage, while breaking another taliban taboo, girls and boys playing music together. which do you like better, the drums or the trumpet? which is more fun? >> the drums. >> reporter: the drums? she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan. where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they're nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sound from their homeland. the tambor, meksed with western harmonies they're also learning. organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> the future of afghanistan, where the children of the country are, the future and that hope is not dead. >> reporter: how does it fe
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
% of their population now under afghan control and security. we've been able to diminish the taliban's capabilities. violence has gone down. we're also developing an afghan army that is increased its operational skill to provide security. so we're on the right path towards trying to give afghanistan the opportunity to govern and secure itself. >> general dempsey, very quickly, women in combat. implementing that. is there some movement on capitol hill to pass a law to make sure you don't change standards, somehow lower standards. do you think that's good legislation? >> they can legislate if they like. they don't have to do that, because -- >> you're not going to change your stance? >> we're going to make sure we have the right standards for right job to maintain the readiness of the force. my primary responsibility is the readiness of the force. there's also requirement as we open up occupational specialties to report to congress, and they would have the opportunity to ask us what we've done to standards. look, this really is about changing the paradigm from one of exclusiveness to inclusiveness to
artillery at taliban units in eastern afghanistan. >> as we wait, lawmakers are going to be grilling john brennan, the architect of this policy during his confirmation hearings for cia director, and that's coming up tomorrow. do you think that this is going to have a big impact, a lot of questions during that confirmation directly on this? >> brennan was put on the grill before over the so called torture memos. he's a career cia officer. he's a magnificent public servant. he's extremely knowledgeable. i'm sure he will be questioned closely about all this. and that's appropriate. having said that, he's not the architect of anything. this is a responsibility the commander in chief, the secretary of defense and the cia director. so that's who we ought to hold accountable. >> are drone strikes the future? >> well, all the other nations are now building drones. and so again, there's precedence here that we should be concerned about. because this sort of tool will be use against us in the coming decades. having said that, we've got to protect the american people. we have decimated al qaeda glob
fought fiercely against the taliban in afghanistan and killing those who breached the perimeter. and army said he displayed exe extraordinary heroism. and from lake city, california he now lives in north dakota with his wife and children. if you want more information about the sergeant, please go to the website, cmohs. cmohs.org. factor tip of the day and by the way i'll be on letterman doesn't if you care. that's it for us tonight. please check out the fox news website, which is different from bill o'reilly.com. also, we would like you to spout out about the factor anywhere in the world, o'reilly@foxnews.com. name and town if you wish to opine. word of the day, don't be with mome. the spin stops here, i'm bill o'reilly, we're looking out for you. >> and this is a fox news alert the manhunt for the rogue lapd police officer christopher dorner is on. he could be anywhere, but in the hopes of sparking a lead, the department is offering a reward for leading to his capture. >> the reward, 1 million dollars. this is the largest local reward ever offered to our knowledge. some ask, why so larg
a charge against taliban fighters who had attacked a small outpost in 2009. eight americans died in that battle. we honor the service of romesha and all of those soldiers. and finally, your voice this week, the question comes from yasin, who asks "where can i rewatch your programs?" well, thank you for watching. every episode is available at our website, abcnews.com/thisweek or check out our web only interviews like this morning newt gingrich will be sticking around to answer your questions. that's all for us today. thank you for sharing part of your sunday with us. check out "world news with david muir" tonight. george will be back next week and we hope you will too. >>> in the news, two boat es are hurt one seriously after colliding with the golden gate ferry. we'll have the latest in a live report. tens of thousands join pope benedict for sunday mass and new details how soon his successor could be chosen. good morning, a live look from emeryville where it's nice and sunny, fog in the south bay, gusty offshore winds and we're talking about end to above normal weather pattern. t
reading -- pakistani schoolgirl attacked by the taliban last year has undergone successful surgery to repair her skull. malala yousafza was left seriously wounded when militants shot her in the head for campaigning for the rights of girls. shortly before her operation, she announced the creation of a new foundation to advocate for children. >> today you can see that i am alive. i can see. i can see you. i concede everyone. today, i can see and i'm getting better day by day. it is because of the prayer's of people. because of the people, men, women, children -- all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers' and because of these prayers, god has given me this new life. this is the second line. i want to serve the people. i want everyone, every girl, every child to be educated. we have organized by fund. >> those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with aaron matÉ. >> welcome to all our listeners and viewers from around the country and around the world. 10 years ago this week, a defining moment oc
. >> there was an interesting story. >> in yemen. >> he was -- he agreed to meet with a member of the taliban which was a very brave thing for him to do. al-qaeda. it was a brave thing for him to do. while they were meeting, they were voiprized by a drone. shocking story. a muss let me [delete]cleric on our side who had preached did the dangers of al-qaeda. and warning people not to be affiliated with them. he, himself, is blown away by a drone strike. >> one of the problems of remote control room warfare, you don't know exactly who you are killing. >> jay carney yesterday also made the point that, yes, we have the authorization, as does this -- the white paper, 16 pages, this authorization to conduct drone strikes exists under the blanket authorization for the war on terror that was given george w. bush by the congress right after september 11th. >> uh-huh >> bill: it's the same authorization that was cited by george bush to justify rendition, torture waterboarding, and wiretapping. >> right and also done in great sec res see. people kept asking carney about t
at the bottom of three steep mountains woke up to an overwhelming attack by the taliban, very smart attack, up to 400 taliban fighters and it seemed impossible and i asked clint rome romechier on monday who is going to be award the the medal of honor, what it was like to face these impossible odds. throughout all of this, did you ever think this is it? i'm not going to get out of here. >> it's like a fighter going into the boxing ring, you know, if you think you're going to lose before you even step into the ring, you've already lost. you're there to win, you're there to fight, you're there to, you know, your brothers to your left and right are depending on you so you don't have that in you. >> when you talk about an overwhelming force describe to me what overwhelming is. >> it's the kind of thing where every time they opened a door to run out to deliver ammunition, a sniper would pick one of them off. there were five guys trapped in a humvee for hours, three men trapped in the mortar pit for hours. the first guy killed was running to a machine gun in the corner of the camp to return fire, kil
ultimately were teaming with taliban fighters, so we talked about that in a special that will air at 10:00 tonight. >>> combat outpost keating was built in 006 with so many troops and assets deployed to iraq, those in afghanistan had to make do. one part of the strategy was to build small outposts as the u.s. pushed into eastern afghanistan. the location was a trap evident from the moment the uniate rrived in may 2009. what was your first reaction? >> first reaction was i think the same as everybody that stepped foot on that, this is a pretty indefensible spot. >> i thought we were supposed to be on top of a mountain. this is crazy. i mean, that's how i felt, you know. shooting up? but you just, i was there, you know, i can't be like this is stupid. >> reporter: this say part of the called the hindu kush mountain range you're either on or in a valley. in order to be near the local population and near the road combat outpost keating was put at the bottom of three steep mountains. ♪ soldiers had been fatally attacked there before. in 2007, private chris pfeiffer, in 2008, camp commander
it said local taliban was working with warlords to provide guards and weapons for the use of the contract. it came out that they were failing to adequately investigate the previous employment which resulted in the company's hiring individuals who previously had been fired for sharing sensitive information. security information with the taliban war lords and failure to appropriately some of according to the u.s. intelligence reports may have been involved in anti-american activity. all of that information was out in a classified we several weeks before it to attend comes out of 28 and was out in public of september 28th. guess who the state department gave the contract to for guarding them on the 29th. the eodt and then the were fired for never performing because they couldn't perform accurately. they wanted to litigate. meanwhile guess who is still guarding. we had egis guarding which was another contract of kabul. we still have armored troops then we did a contract with the jet. they finally took over the summer. i urge you all to take a look and you do not have to come secretary, you ca
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)